Why Are Motherboard Green?

Computer motherboards and most other electronic circuit boards are generally green in color. This is because such electronic boards are coated with a polymer called solder mask, which insulates and protects the printed copper traces of a motherboard during the soldering process.

Why Green?

Green patch cover has been a conventional industry standard for quite a long time. However no particular explanation is given for picking green over different tones, green enjoys its benefits. Silkscreen printing is effectively intelligible on a green foundation, for instance, and the boundless reception of green as a standard tone empowers producers to utilize different shades of weld cover for models.

Different Colors

With the developing ubiquity of clear PC cases and case windows, the internal functions of PCs are as of now not stowed away from seeing. This has provoked a few fabricates to try different things with different shades of bind veil, like red, blue, and yellow, to give their items an extraordinary appearance.

A solder mask coating helps insulate and protect sections of a motherboard where no soldering is required during mass assembly. A soldier mask is also necessary for silkscreen printing on a circuit board.

In the good ‘old days, because of innovative limitations, quality examinations depended on specialists physically checking the sheets with their uncovered eyes. Squinting at little circuits all days is tiring work, however nervous system specialists and clinicians concur that the frequency of green light affects the body and can decrease weakness.

Also, they have tracked down that the sensors in natural eyes, or cones, are generally touchy to green light. In this way, the differentiation is more noteworthy between the circuit follows cushions, silkscreen printing, and void spaces. Just by noticing the sheets from an external perspective, one can without much of a stretch recognize deserts in the external layers. Look at the beneath pictures of green sheets to different tones like blue, yellow, or even high contrast. With higher differentiation, blunders are simpler to spot.

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