Is My Ram Compatible With My Motherboard?

What does “compatible” really mean?

In the case of computing hardware “compatible” means that the device is capable to run in conjunction with your motherboard – like a printer is capable to run only if a program for its specific brand has been installed. So here we’re talking about whether or not there’s a driver for the RAM modules attached to your board, not about whether they’re actually working as long as you have this driver.

RAM Compatibility with motherboard

Which RAM Is Compatible With My Motherboard?

To find the right RAM for your motherboard, first, you need to figure out which type of RAM slot(s) your motherboard supports. This is easy: Look at your motherboard and/or BIOS settings, then look at the list below to see what types of RAM slots you have on your motherboard. You should only consider purchasing a matching pair of RAM modules (2 in 1 or 4 in 2).

You must also make sure that your motherboard can handle the frequency of RAM sticks you want to use! For example, if you are using DDR1 800MHz sticks, but your board can only handle DDR400MHz, they will not work and you may damage them by using them anyway.

Also, note that some motherboards allow peerless mixing of different types of RAM. For example, you can use DDR1, DDR2, and/or the new DDR3 RAM in some motherboards as long as they all are the same size (DIMM or RIMM).

Here is a list of all current RAM slot types found on modern PC hardware. Hopefully, this will help you to find the correct type of RAM for your computer!

List of all Current RAM Slot

168-pin DIMM
0-pin SO DIMM (Small Outline Dual In-line Memory Module),
184-pin RIMM (Rambus Inline Memory Module)
184-pin DIMM (Dual In-line Memory Module)

To find out which kind of RAM is compatible with my motherboard:

  1. First, look at your motherboard or BIOS settings and figure out if it supports DDR, DDR2, or DDR3 memory (and the maximum frequency).
  2. Then look below to see if your board matches one of the examples above to find a match between the type of slots on your motherboard and the types of sticks you want to get.
  3. If all else fails, use the online RAM configurator to figure out which memory sticks are compatible with your motherboard.

What does my motherboard require?

Most modern motherboards are equipped with two slots for RAM: one which supports DDR3 DIMMs and another one that takes standard older DDR2 may work on both operating systems, the drivers, and software it requires to work only come with one of them.

In the case of computing hardware “compatible” means that the device is capable to run in conjunction with your motherboard – like a printer is capable to run only if a program for its specific brand has been installed.

So here we’re talking about whether or not there’s a driver for the RAM modules attached to your board, not about whether they’re actually working as long as you have this driver.

DDR Generation Do I Need?

A complete list of current DDR memory modules, along with the maximum recommended system platform type.

I’ve tried to make the following list as inclusive as possible, listing all DDR generations from PC3200/DDR400 (533MHz) to PC2100/DDR266 (333MHz) and their appropriate platforms. If you feel there are any glaring omissions, please let me know and I will include them in a future update.

 Different types of DDR memory:

  1. DDR: These modules have 184 pins, and the notch is near the center.
  2. DDR2: These modules have 244 pins, and the notch is near the center.
  3. DDR3: These modules have 240 pins, and the notch is offset to one side.
  4. DDR4: These modules have 288 pins, and the notch is near the center.

How to identify the types of Ram

How to check ram compatibility ​with motherboard?

The best way to see if your ram is compatible with the motherboard/computer you intend to use it in is to look up the name and model of the computer. Then look for a FAQ (frequently asked questions) section on that manufacturer’s website, or search Google for information on compatibility.

RAM chips are very tiny and delicate.
Caution must be used when installing memory modules into a computer.
Be sure the DIMM (Dual In-line Memory Module) is compatible with the motherboard.

Common Errors:

The following common errors will result in boot failure. Avoiding these problems is necessary for successful system operation.

The two most common causes of boot failures are

  1.  incorrect configuration file syntax
  2. missing the “System/Library/Extensions” folder on your hard drive.

 

 

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